Wednesday, February 17, 2016

Snow Daze

You'd think, dependent as we Americans are on the automobile, we'd be good drivers, yes? Nay, not so. This video shows the result of 3 inches, 7.62 centimetres, of snow on a major interstate. The 50 vehicle smash happened next to the family farm . . . this is not my video however; we knew better than to be on the roads after seeing this: (Scroll down for vid.)




Is it unreasonably cranky for me to suggest that too many drivers must have gotten their licence from a Cracker Jack box? Or that remedial driving school should be considered?


33 comments:

  1. I noticed when in towns in Canada, that everyone tears around in their cars on pack-ice as if it was not there. I never saw even a skid. When I asked how they do this, a local said, "Because we're used to it."

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  2. Thing is, 'being used to it' doesn't stop skidding and losing control. After living in Colorado for over 40 years with icy, snow packed highways/streets....it's easy to slide off or run into another vehicle, even if traveling at 10MPH. It's not the skill, it's the black ice most often that is treacherous. And there is no way to stop.

    I would be like you....just stay home.

    BUT!! I wanna know why that fool in the bright vest is out walking?!!! He could've fallen in front of a car heading the opposite direction...lord have mercy.

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    1. I wondered that myself Anni, guess he prefers being on the shallow end of the gene pool?

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  3. Aaaaahhhhh there were buses and cars and everything else smashed or stuck around here yesterday. I do agree about the cracker box, there seems to be a few of those graduates:) Hug B

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    1. That was a favourite saying of my Dad's, I find myself using it more frequently as I get older, lol. *hugs*

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  4. I think remedial training might be a good idea, also daily or even twice daily media reminders that current weather conditions indicate a need for more driver awareness and a lesser speed.
    People get used to driving in the dry and continue to drive the same way in the wet or snow, forgetting that roads are slicker and visibility poorer. Not to mention stopping time is slower with tyres slipping and skidding.

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    1. So many times it seems as though driver bravado requires them to drive more recklessly than usual.

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  5. I drove on it last night... Road wasn't plowed here yet. It makes me anxious but I just try to drive cautiously and slow. We are also on day two of no power here.

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    1. Hope the power situation is quickly rectified! Even though we live in a small city, I don't recall our street ever being plowed or gritted.

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  6. being in my area we don't see such scenes but only through t.v or blog like your's yet still i can imagine how scary it is to loose control in such moments ,hope for better attitude from people dear

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  7. I often drover I80 home from New Jersey after a show. Got gas at the PA line. It was raining and cold. Considered just going over to the motel for the night, but stupidly got on, instead. In my journey to the next exit on black ice I crept along with two tires on the rumble strips, and watched a semi pass me, too fast, and sail right into the median. Then a red sport car came down the on ramp and accelerated around me, out of sight. Further up the mountain the car was in the ravine, back end smashed into the mountain, driver standing by the car. I chugged up, up, up, took the exit which had no services. Saw a large lot with many dumpsters. Pulled in by one, bundled up as best I could and fell asleep. About 4 am there were bright lights in my eyes and an angry man pounding on my window. He was there to load up his container I was parked beside.
    When I drove I encountered a lot of unexpected weather I had to deal with, some dangerous. I always maintained my vehicle, especially my tires, drove with respect for the conditions and never had or caused an accident.
    I agree--if you don't know how to drive in bad weather, stay home.

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    1. I do know how to drive in bad weather... but my reaction times are not up to it. The Skinny Sweetie is an excellent driver but really, if one doesn't have to go out in it why do so?
      We did the shopping on Saturday and lazed by the fire on Sunday, and that's just the way I like it.

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  8. I tend to stay home when that crap occurs for that reason. People drive like idiots.

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  9. Yikes, that's a lot of cars piled up.

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  10. That was a terrible pile up. I think it's the one I saw on the news. I realize that some people have to be out in those conditions, but there are others who simply drive too fast for conditions. It always amazes me at what we see when out and about, the cars zooming past, in such a hurry [to become part of an accident, evidently.] Smart to stay home!

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  11. Snow and Ice is natures way of saying "Slow Down". I prefer to stay off the roads if there is a chance of ice. Here in the South, we do not get the good traction snow like the North. We get Ice then snow, then ice. Makes a mess that is not worth venturing out into.
    Lisa

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    1. We're on the border of two major weather systems; the Ohio Valley and (Great)Lake Effect systems. It makes for very nasty weather at times.

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  12. We get very little snow here - or that crash would be replicated. Even in the rain our drivers seem to follow simple rules.
    Drive faster so you get home quickly (all our cars are obviously made of cardboard and will dissolve if we don't)
    And
    If we drive as close as possible to the car in front they will get wet and we won't.
    Which explains a lot.

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    1. Methinks Indiana drivers take our being the home of the Indianapolis 500 FAR too seriously.

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  13. This accident was shown on our news, well the aftermath.

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    1. Wow, that far away? The bridge shown in the video is over Deer Creek, which forms the boundary of the family farm.

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  14. Awful. And all it takes is one car to cause that much damage.

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    1. So true, Mitchell. During the blizzard of '78 my folks were kept very busy... drivers stranded on the interstate used their CB's to contact my folks and ask them to call family members. They wanted to let them know they were safe.

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  15. I am not saying what I told Roger...but in normal weather, I don't even like to be on I-70....much less when there is snow.

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  16. And that is why I stay home during the snow! I freely admit that I have absolutely no business driving in the snow. I think the problem comes from too many people not being willing to make that admission.

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C'mon, be cranky and let 'er rip!